Frequent readers of this blog may recall the following win of the week from back in in early April:

 

PPC Ad #1

PPC Win of the Week - Ad #1
PPC Ad #2

PPC Win of the Week - Ad #2

 
Well, the Booster responsible for the winning version (PPC Ad #1), writing under use name of “Cartmetrix,” had this to say about his approach:

I did browse the client’s website for a while to see what words they used to describe their own products. Most of the adjectives came straight from their copy. A little keyword research showed the word ‘handmade’ appeared in searches as ‘handmade furniture’ more than any other keyword appearing with ‘furniture’. It seemed like a much queried, quality keyword to try. Plus, I think it provides a pleasing picture of quality in the reader’s eye.

 

And so I’d like to break Cartmetrix’s comments down into three principles:

1) Leveraging effective sales copy from the clients landing page within the ad

 

“I did browse the client’s website for a while to see what words they used to describe their own products. Most of the adjectives came straight from their copy.”

 

It’s astonishing how often client’s landing pages contain powerful sales strategies, guarantees, and messaging that is totally absent from their PPC Ads. The idea is to have strong match-up between what’s promised in the ad and what’s delivered on the landing page. So if your landing page is converting well, mine what you can from it for potential use in your Ad Words ads.

2) Using the same language buyers use when searching for and describing your product

 

“A little keyword research showed the word ‘handmade’ appeared in searches as ‘handmade furniture’ more than any other keyword appearing with ‘furniture’. It seemed like a much queried, quality keyword to try.”

 

The more you can match-up what your ad promises with what prospective customers really want and are searching on, the better you’ll do in terms of Click-Through-Rate. And, as mentioned in point #1, the better your landing page delivers on that promise, the better you’ll do in terms of Conversion Rate.

3) Look for the desire behind the keywords – appeal to the mind’s eye

 

“Plus, I think it provides a pleasing picture of quality in the reader’s eye.”

 

Sensory, visualizable, and emotionally evocative words simply tend to pull better than their less enticing counterparts. “Quality Furniture” is one thing, but “Handmade Furniture” says something far more powerfully appealing. Chances are, prospective customers were searching for nice furniture that wasn’t, um, too dainty shall we say. Something of real, honest quality. And doesn’t “Handmade Furniture” encapsulate exactly that attitude?

 

So while keywords are enormously important, it’s really the psychology underlying those keywords that will make or break an ad.

 

And that’s all folks. Special thanks to Cartmetrix for his insights. And a gentle reminder that if you’d like someone as savvy as Cartmetrix writing your ads, you can get exactly that level of ad writing talent right here at BoostCTR : )